Top Health Tools
Top Health Tools

Top Reports
Top Reports
 
Top Articles
Top Articles

Top Reviews
Top Reviews
   
Snacking Beside Specific Body
Types Influences Your Choices


It is well established that we look to others for cues about how much food to eat. Break bread with a glutton, and youll most likely eat a big portion too. But a paper soon to be published in the Journal of Consumer Research explores the way that these choices are affected by the body type of the other person eating.

Researchers at the University of British Columbia recruited female undergraduates to participate in a dummy study, wherein they watched a video clip while eating M&Ms they had scooped into a bowl. Before each subject took her M&Ms, a trained confederate, supposedly a fellow student also doing the experiment, first took 108 grams of M&Ms, or five heaping teaspoons, into a bowl of her own. The confederate was 5 feet, 2 inches tall; weighed 105 pounds; and wore a size zero. Half the time, she wore an elaborate obesity prosthesis that made her appear to weigh about 180 pounds and required size 16 clothing. Students who saw the obese confederate took far fewer M&Ms than those who saw the thin confederate.

In another experiment, the researchers found that the obese confederates portions always inspired less mimicry than those of the thin confederate, even when small. "If you see a thin person order a salad for dinner, it kind of reminds you, If I'm going to look like that, I'd better get something very small," said Brent McFerran, an assistant professor at the university who was one of the papers authors. "If you see such a portion ordered by someone whos very obese, you think, well, they need to eat that little, they're on a diet, but I'm not like that."


Reference Source 133
September 7, 2009

Share/Bookmark
...............................................................................................................

This site is owned and operated by PreventDisease.com 1999-2017. All Rights Reserved. All content on this site may be copied, without permission, whether reproduced digitally or in print, provided copyright, reference and source information are intact and use is strictly for not-for-profit purposes. Please review our copyright policy for full details.
aaa
Interact
volunteerDonateWrite For Us
Stay Connected With Our Newsletter