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Gulf Loop Current Destroyed: May Lead To Shut Down of Atlantic Thermoregulation, Rapid Cooling

Scientists are on high alert following the confirmed shutdown of the Gulf loop current now correlated to the biochemical and physical action of the BP oil spill on the Gulf stream. The shutdown of the current not only influences the strength of hurricanes but the climate of the entire planet.

On June 12, 2010, The Institute of Atmospheric Sciences and Climate (ISAC) released "Risk of Global Climate Change By BP Oil Spill", a document detailing how the BP spill may cause irreparable damage to the Gulf Stream global climate thermoregulation activity.

"The Gulf Stream importance in the global climate thermoregulation process is well assessed", states author Gianluigi Zangari. He adds "The latest real time satellite (Jason, Topex/Poseidon, Geosat Follow-On, ERS-2, Envisat) data maps of May-June 2010 processed by CCAR1,2 (Colorado Center for Astrodynamics Research), checked at Frascati Laboratories by the means of the SHT congruent calculus3 and compared with past years data, show for the first time a direct evidence of the rapid breaking of the Loop Current, a warm ocean current, crucial part of the Gulf Stream."

Radio personality Dr. Bill Deagle discusses the evidence of a break in the loop current and potential climate changes with Dr. Gianluigi Zangari.

In fluid dynamics, an eddy is the swirling of a fluid and the reverse current created when the fluid flows past an obstacle. The moving fluid creates a space devoid of downstream-flowing fluid on the downstream side of the object. Fluid behind the obstacle flows into the void creating a swirl of fluid on each edge of the obstacle, followed by a short reverse flow of fluid behind the obstacle flowing upstream, toward the back of the obstacle. The release further explained that June 12th marked the point in which the eddy had detached itself completely from the mainstream therefore destroying the Loop Current as seen in the figures below.

The hollywood blockbuster "The Day After Tomorrow" gives a theoretical yet very plausible consequence of thermoirregulation of ocean currents and their effect on global climate.

The world is enduring the hottest year on record, according to a U.S. national weather analysis, causing droughts worldwide and a concern for farmers counting on another bumper year.

Period of a El Nino weather pattern is being blamed for the hot temperatures globally, although changes in the ozone, increased ultraviolet light and increased volcanism are all wild cards in the same equation.

Abnormally warm temperatures have been registered in large parts of Canada, Africa, tropical oceans and parts of the Middle East.

Northern Thailand is struggling through the worst drought in 20 years, while Israel is in the middle of the longest and most severe drought since 1920s. In Britain, this year has been the driest since 1929.

"Couple the global temperature increases with changes in the thermoregulation of the ocean's currents could spell disaster," stated climatologist Enrico Lopez. "We just don't have the data to ethis with change

There are eight forms of vitamin E: Four tocopherols (alpha, beta, gamma, delta) and four tocotrienols (alpha, beta, gamma, delta). Alpha-tocopherol (alpha-Toc) is the main source found in supplements and in the European diet, while gamma-tocopherol (gamma-Toc) is the most common form in the American diet.

Tocotrienols are only minor components in plants, although several sources with relatively high levels include palm oil, cereal grains and rice bran.

Study details

For the new study, the Rotterdam-based scientists analysed data on the intakes of antioxidants – vitamins C and E, beta-carotene and flavonoids – in 5,395 people aged 55 and older. Questionnaires and meal-based checklists were used to establish intakes of these micronutrients.

The participants were followed for about 10 years, during which 465 people developed dementia, of which 365 cases were for Alzheimer's disease.

After crunching the numbers, the researchers calculated that people with an average intake of 18.5 milligrams of vitamin E per day were 25 percent less likely to develop dementia than the people with an average of 9 milligrams per day. On the other hand, no associations were observed for dietary intake levels of vitamin C, beta-carotene and flavonoids.

"The brain is a site of high metabolic activity, which makes it vulnerable to oxidative damage, and slow accumulation of such damage over a lifetime may contribute to the development of dementia," wrote the authors.

"In particular, when beta-amyloid (a hallmark of pathologic Alzheimer's disease) accumulates in the brain, an inflammatory response is likely evoked that produces nitric oxide radicals and downstream neurodegenerative effects. Vitamin E is a powerful fat-soluble antioxidant that may help to inhibit the pathogenesis of dementia."

D and cognitive decline

The current issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine also carries new data from British researchers, who report that seniors with low levels of vitamin D may be at an increased risk of cognitive decline.

Our cognitive performance declines naturally as we age, but new data from David Llewellyn and his colleagues at the University of Exeter in England indicated that insufficient levels of vitamin D may accelerate this decline.

The Exeter-based scientists analysed vitamin D levels from blood samples of 858 adults aged 65 or older. Cognitive tests were undertaken at the start of the study, and again after three and six years.

The data showed that severe vitamin D deficiency, defined as blood levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) of less than 25 nanomoles per liter - were associated with a 60 percent increase in the risk of substantial cognitive decline.

"If future prospective studies and randomized controlled trials confirm that vitamin D deficiency is causally related to cognitive decline, then this would open up important new possibilities for treatment and prevention," concluded Llewellyn and his co-workers.

In an accompanying editorial, Andrew Grey and Mark Bolland from the University of Auckland said it was now time to test the various hypotheses generated by observational studies of vitamin D in order to establish the potential public health benefit of raising vitamin D levels.

"Very importantly, such trials will also provide an opportunity to systematically assess potential harms of vitamin D supplementation, an issue that has been largely overlooked or dismissed. We should invest in trials that provide the best possible evidence on the benefits and risks of vitamin D before we invest in costly, difficult and potentially unrewarding interventional strategies,” wrote Grey and Bolland.

Sources: Archives of Intern Medicine


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