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New York Times and Other Media Pushing for Drugging Water Supply

Editor's note: Interesting to note that Jacob M. Appel is a bioethicist and fiction writer as noted on his bio on bigthink.com

Big Think, a website that interviews scientists and experts in various fields has begun a month-long series called, “Dangerous Ideas” and the first post features drugging the public water supply. The expert they interviewed for this story is Jacob M. Appel, a bioethicist and medical historian, who has written in favor of adding lithium to the public water supply. He states clearly that he believes lithium and other “enhancers” are beneficial additions to our public water supply and any opposition is based on false assumptions that natural water is better than artificially enhanced water.


He expanded on this claim in his 2009 article featured in Huffington Post. In the article he cites a Japanese study claiming that lithium reduces suicides.


Meanwhile, the New York Times has published a story admitting that drugs are currently in the public water supply. These drugs include Ibuprofen, Naproxen, anti-epileptic and anti-anxiety drugs.

Earlier this week, Aaron Dykes wrote a detailed article in response to an Oxford professor calling for adding drugs to the water supply.

Lithium is a much more powerful substance than fluoride, with far greater potential side effects.  Critics say that drugging the water is a massive infringement and equate this use of pharmaceuticals to something out of Aldous Huxley’s dystopic classic “Brave New World.”

Robert Carton, a former senior scientist for the EPA, argues that the government's fortifying drinking water with any substance, even fluoride, violates people's fundamental right—codified in the Nuremburg Code—to give informed consent to any medical intervention. “All ethical codes for the protection of individuals who are subject to medical procedures," Carton wrote in the International Journal of Occupational and Environmental Health, "whether research or routine medical treatment, endorse the basic requirement for voluntary informed consent.”


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