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Once and For All, Sunlight Does Not Cause Cancer!

The idea that sunscreen prevents cancer is a myth promoted by pharmaceutical companies, conventional medicine and the mainstream media for one purpose...profit.

The sunscreen industry makes money by selling lotion products that actually contain cancer-causing chemicals. It then donates a portion of that money to the cancer industry through non-profit groups like the American and Canadian Cancer Societies which, in turn, run heart-breaking public service ads urging people to use sunscreen to "prevent cancer."

Exposure to ultraviolet A light has already been shown not to cause melanoma in a study from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center reported in the online Early Edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

UVA exposure is unlikely to have contributed to the rise in the incidence of melanoma over the past 30 years, the researchers concluded, because the model used had been the only animal model to indicate a connection between exposure to UVA at a young age and later development of melanoma.

"Our data refute the only direct evidence that UVA causes melanoma, which is not to say that UVA is harmless," said the study's lead author David Mitchell, Ph.D., professor in M. D. Anderson's Department of Carcinogenesis located at its Science Park -- Research Division in Smithville, Texas. "UVA is just not as dangerous as we thought because it doesn't cause melanoma."

Sunlight is Your Best Protection Against Cancer

Numerous studies have linked vitamin D levels to a reduction in the risk of certain cancers, including breast cancer, but much debate has focused on the means to boost vitamin D levels – supplements or sunlight.

The link between vitamin D intake and protection from cancer dates from the 1940s when Frank Apperly demonstrated a link between latitude and deaths from cancer, and suggested that sunlight gave "a relative cancer immunity".

Since then there have been numerous studies suggesting associations between vitamin D and lower risks of certain cancers.

Vitamin D refers to two biologically inactive precursors – cholecalciferol (D3) and ergocalciferol (D2).

Both D3 and D2 precursors are hydroxylated in the liver and kidneys to form 25- hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D), the non-active 'storage' form, and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)2D), the biologically active form that is tightly controlled by the body.

There is growing evidence that 1,25(OH)2D has anticancer effects, but the discovery that non-kidney cells can also hydroxylate 25(OH)D had profound implications, implying that higher 25(OH)D levels protects against cancer in the local sites.

A research team from the Northern California Cancer Center, the University of Southern California, and Wake Forest University School of Medicine has found that increased exposure to sunlight – which increases levels of vitamin D in the body -- may decrease the risk of advanced breast cancer.

In a study reported online this week in the American Journal of Epidemiology, the researchers found that women with high sun exposure had half the risk of developing advanced breast cancer, which is cancer that has spread beyond the breast, compared to women with low sun exposure. These findings were observed only for women with naturally light skin color. The study defined high sun exposure as having dark skin on the forehead, an area that is usually exposed to sunlight.


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