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December 16, 2011
What Prevents Chicken Pox From Spreading? Hint: It Has Nothing To Do With a Vaccine


It's something the The American Academy of Pediatrics, a major supporter of mandatory chicken pox and other vaccine mandates, would never admit to. Ultraviolet rays and vitamin D help prevent the spread of chickenpox, meaning people in milder climates are more at risk of catching the disease, according to new research. The discovery could lead to natural approaches of preventing chickenpox and its more severe relative, shingles.

Vaccine manufacturers, namely Merck, who conjure up the pseudoscientific and fraudulent data on chicken pox vaccines will stop at nothing to prevent the public from knowing the truth. The American Academy of Pediatrics shares incestuous financial ties with Merck, and hence it is also in their best interest to fabricate data on the actual causes of the virus.

It has long been known that vitamin D and UV rays from the sun can inactivate viruses. However, virologist Dr Phil Rice believes his findings indicate that UV rays could inactivate the varicella-zoster virus -- the herpes virus responsible for chickenpox and shingles -- on the skin before it transmits to another person. This explains why there is less transmission in the tropics, where chickenpox is much less frequent than in temperate countries. It would also explain why chickenpox peaks in temperate zones -- where it is seasonal -- in winter and spring, when UV rays are lowest.

Previously, it was thought that geographical differences in chickenpox incidence were related to heat, humidity, population density, or infection with other viruses that protect against it. The new data puts perspective on what actually prevents chicken pox from spreading and it has nothing to do with a vaccine.

The claim by public health officials is that 90% of children who are not vaccinated for chickenpox will get it by the time they are twelve. However, studies have demonstrated that the virus remains dormant in the body of those who are vaccinated and can become active again later on. Other studies show that the frequency and incidence are regardless of vaccination rates as those vaccinated still contract the virus and all its symptoms.

Dr Rice examined data from 25 studies on varicella-zoster virus prevalence patterns in both temperate and tropical areas across the globe. He plotted the data against a range of climatic factors, to examine what might be the most likely causes of increased prevalence. The data showed that -- once other factors were ruled out -- UV rays were the only factor to match the infection patterns in each country studied.

Dr Rice, whose study has been published in Virology Journal, said: "No one had considered UV as a factor before, but when I looked at the epidemiological studies they showed a good correlation between global latitude and the presence of the virus.

"One convincing factor of the hypothesis is that there was an explanation for every anomaly. For example, the peak incidence of chickenpox in India and Sri Lanka is during the hot, dry, sunny season. You would expect chickenpox to be at its lowest at this time, so at first this didn't fit the theory. However, this was explained because UV rays are actually much lower in the dry season compared with the monsoon period. In the dry season, the pollution in the atmosphere reflects the UV rays back into space before they reach us. But in monsoon season, the rains wash away the pollution, meaning the UV rays can get through."

Dr Rice also believes his findings show why two distinct genetic types of the virus have formed -- a temperate type and a tropical one. He found that the temperate genotype only transmitted in the tropics when UV radiation was either reduced or negated. It was found to transmit in the home, for example, but not outside. The tropical genotype, however, was found to transmit in the tropics in the presence of UV rays, suggesting it has some resistance. Dr Rice believes this is because the temperate virus line -- which broke off from the original tropical genotype -- has lost the UV resistance still present in the tropical line.

"For the temperate virus line to have lost the selective advantage of resistance to UV rays as it broke off from the original tropical virus, it must have gained an advantage in the virus life cycle as an evolutionary trade off. An obvious advantage would be an ability to reactivate more easily, as shingles. The virus can only have one of these survival advantages, not both. This might explain why shingles appears to be so much less common in people from the tropics, and why the temperate virus reactivates much more readily than the tropical type."

The research further lends credence to why chicken pox vaccines are redundant for populations in both temperate and tropical climates. Not only are they statistically ineffective, but they further depress the immune system through a full range of complement preservatives and other toxins which only make vaccinated populations much more susceptible to viruses and other childhood diseases such as chicken pox. These are diseases which simply must run their course to guarantee natural immunity for life.

Dave Mihalovic is a Naturopathic Doctor who specializes in vaccine research, cancer prevention and a natural approach to treatment.


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