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February 6, 2012
Pharmacology Journal Admits Supplements Reduce Colon Cancer Risk

It's may quite the revelation for a scientific journal based in pharmacology to admit that vitamin and mineral supplements reduce the risk of colon cancer and protect against carcinogens, but the Canadian Journal of Physiology and Pharmacology (CJPP) is an exception and that's exactly what a recently published study concluded.
The study found that rats given regular multivitamin and mineral supplements showed a significantly lower risk of developing colon cancer when they were exposed to carcinogens.


"It has been unclear whether multivitamin supplementation to cancer patients is helpful, has no effect, or is even detrimental during therapy," commented Dr. Grant Pierce, Editor of CJPP. "This study is important because it gives some direction to cancer patients in desperate need of guidance on the value of multivitamins and minerals administered during cancer."

The authors studied rats that were fed a high-fat diet (20% fat) over a 32 week period. The rats were divided into 6 groups, which were exposed to different combinations of supplements and carcinogens; the colon carcinogenisis induced in the study rats has characteristics that mimic human colon cancer. Rats fed a high-fat plus low-fibre diet and exposed to carcinogens developed pre-cancerous lesions; whereas, rats undergoing similar treatment, but provided with daily multivitamin and mineral supplements, showed a significant (84%) reduction in the formation of pre-cancerous lesions and did not develop tumours.

Many natural foods that supplement manufacturers are now formulating into supplments have vast amounts of scientific research to back their claims in preventing many different types of cancers. For example, A compound found in blueberries shows promise in animal studies of preventing colon cancer, according to a joint study by scientists at Rutgers University and the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

According to researchers at the University of Alabama in Birmingham, chemicals obtained from grape seed extract show promise in animal studies as a way to prevent sunlight-induced skin cancer when used as a dietary supplement.

The Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center in Denver has shown that a dietary component found in most whole grain foods, beans, nuts and other high-fiber items shows promise in animal studies as a potent weapon for preventing prostate cancer.

These B vitamins play a role in lowering homocysteine levels in the blood and thus may help reduce the risk of heart disease and also help prevent cervical and colon cancer.

The authors of the CJPP study conclude that "multivitamin and mineral supplements synergistically contribute to the cancer chemopreventative potential, and hence, regular supplements of multivitamins and minerals could reduce the risk of colon cancer."

Journal Source:
nrcresearchpress.com


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