Top Health Tools
Top Health Tools

Top Reports
Top Reports
Top Articles
Top Articles

Top Reviews
Top Reviews
   


February 8, 2012
New Study Finds Soft Drinks Cause Asthma and Lung Disorders


A new study published in the journal Respirology reveals that soft drink consumption is associated with lung and breathing disorders including asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).


Soft drinks account for more than a quarter of all drinks consumed in the United States. That works out to at least one 12-ounce can per day for every man, woman and child.

Diet soft drinks have recently been linked to stroke, heart attack, and vascular death. Consuming two or more soft drinks per week also increases the risk of developing pancreatic cancer by nearly twofold compared to individuals who did not consume soft drinks.

Mechanical damage to cells is a huge risk factor for cancer. It's why asbestos particles, for example, cause lung cancer. The claim by scientists is that soft drinks now have the same effect by their lasting damage on the esophagus via similar mechanisms.
 
Kids are heavy consumers of soft drinks, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, and they are guzzling soda pop at unprecedented rates. "It should be of great concern to any parent or educator that younger populations are consuming these very health hazardous beverages which are negatively affecting their fragile breathing organs," said food industry critic and chemist Guy LeBlanc.

In the new study led by Zumin Shi, MD, PhD, of the University of Adelaide, researchers conducted computer assisted telephone interviewing among 16,907 participants aged 16 years and older in South Australia between March 2008 and June 2010 inquiring about soft drink consumption. Soft drinks comprised Coke, lemonade, flavored mineral water, Powerade, and Gatorade etc.

Results showed that one in ten adults drink more than half a liter of soft drink daily in South Australia. The amount of soft drink consumption is associated with an increased chance of asthma and/or COPD. There exists a dose-response relationship, which means the more soft drink one consumes, the higher the chance of having these diseases.

Overall, 13.3% of participants with asthma and 15.6% of those with COPD reported consuming more than half a liter of soft drink per day.

The odds ratio for asthma and COPD was 1.26 and 1.79, comparing those who consumed more than half a liter of soft drink per day with those who did not consume soft drinks.

Furthermore, smoking makes this relationship even worse, especially for COPD. Compared with those who did not smoke and consume soft drinks, those that consumed more than half a liter of soft drink per day and were current smokers had a 6.6-fold greater risk of COPD.


Share/Bookmark
...............................................................................................................

This site is owned and operated by PreventDisease.com 1999-2016. All Rights Reserved. All content on this site may be copied, without permission, whether reproduced digitally or in print, provided copyright, reference and source information are intact and use is strictly for not-for-profit purposes. Please review our copyright policy for full details.
aaa
Interact
volunteerDonateWrite For Us
Stay Connected With Our Newsletter