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February 14, 2012
Magnesium Reduces Blood Pressure Naturally Without Side Effects


Pharmaceutical interventions in patients with high blood pressure leads to an inevitable deterioration of health in the long-term. In addition, the side effects associated with blood pressure medications may lead to hospitalization. Supplements of magnesium may offer natural and clinically significant reductions' in blood pressure, says a new meta-analysis from the UK.


There is significant evidence that magnesium supplementation ameliorates insulin resistance in obese, insulin resistant subjects.

Mixing commonly used antibiotics with common blood pressure medications may cause hypotension (abnormally low blood pressure) and induce shock in older patients, requiring hospitalization, according to a study published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) (pre-embargo link only) http://www.cmaj.ca/embargo/cmaj100702.pdf which has led many physicans to question prescribing blood pressure medications at all while prescribing antibiotics.

The Natural Way

A diet rich in magnesium may help reduce the incidence of metabolic syndrome, the cluster of conditions that can lead to diabetes and coronary heart disease.

Data from 22 trials with magnesium supplements revealed that the mineral may reduce systolic and diastolic blood pressure, researchers from the University of Hertfordshire report in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

Combined with diet and lifestyle changes, magnesium supplementation may lead to an overall reduction of up to 15-20mm Hg.

Systolic function relates to the contraction of the heart, whereas diastolic relates to the filling of the heart with blood.

"Magnesium supplementation appears to achieve a small but clinically significant reduction in BP, an effect worthy of future prospective large randomised trials using solid methodology," wrote researchers, led by Lindsy Kass.

Minerals and Stroke

Diet is known to have an impact on a person's risk cardiovascular disease, and in particular a connection has been made between intake of sodium and hypertension. Conversely, more magnesium, potassium and calcium have been inversely linked to hypertension in some observational studies.

Dietary sources of magnesium include green, leafy vegetables, meats, starches, grains and nuts, and milk. Earlier dietary surveys show that a large portion of adults does not meet the RDA for magnesium (320 mg per day for women and 420 mg per day for men).

Recently, scientists from the Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm, Sweden reported that, data pooled from seven prospective studies revealed that, for every 100 mg per day increase in magnesium intake, the risk of stroke was reduced by about 9% (American Journal of Clinical Nutrition).

Kass and her co-workers analysed data from 22 trials involving 1,173 people. Magnesium supplementation doses ranged from 120 to 973 mg with trial duration ranging from three to 24 weeks.

The overall data indicated that magnesium supplementation was associated with a 3 to 4 mmHg reduction in systolic blood pressure and a 2-3 mmHg reduction in diastolic blood pressure, with the best results observed for doses over 370 milligrams per day.

Data from pharmaceutical trials has revealed that a reduction in systolic blood pressure of between 0.8 and 2 mmHg was "clinically significant in reducing the incidence of coronary heart disease, heart failure and stroke.

"The clinical significance in the reductions found from this meta-analysis is potentially very important," said the researchers.

High blood pressure (hypertension),defined as having a systolic and diastolic blood pressure (BP) greater than 140 and 90 mmHg, is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD).

Source:
European Journal of Clinical Nutrition


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