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March 27, 2012
Eating Slower Can Make You Lose 6 Pounds The First Month Researchers Show


Remember when your mother told you to chew your food slowly? Well, it turns out that she was right. Eating fast does not allow your brain to react to the satiety signal coming from your body. This will lead you to believe that you are still hungry when your body really just needs some time to tell your brain that you’re full. New research shows that eating slower reduces the amount of food consumed and can lead to substantial weight loss over time.


Results of two new studies fromt he University of Rhode Island revealed that men eat significantly faster than women, heavier people eat faster than slimmer people, and refined grains are consumed faster than whole grains, among other findings.

In one laboratory study, Kathleen Melanson, URI associate professor of nutrition, and her lab team found that fast eaters consumed about 3.1 ounces of food per minute, medium-speed eaters consumed 2.5 ounces per minute, and slow eaters consumed 2 ounces per minute.

The researchers also found what Melanson described as 'very strong gender differences' in eating rates.

At lunch, the men consumed about 80 calories per minute while the women consumed 52 calories per minute.

Fitness expert and nutritionist Darlene Summerly said the average person that begins to modify their eating patterns into a "slow eater" will notice modest weight loss in the first month alone. "Our research shows the average person with a BMI of 27 or more -- which is slightly overweight -- will experience an average of 6 pounds of weight loss within the first month alone," Summerly stated.

The second study, which examined the characteristics associated with eating rates, found a close association between eating rate and body mass index (BMI), with those individuals with a high BMI typically eating considerably faster than those with a low BMI.

"One theory we are pursuing is that fast eating may be related to greater energy needs, since men and heavier people have higher energy needs," said Melanson.

While the link between eating rate and obesity is still being studied, Melanson said that her research has demonstrated that eating slowly results in significantly fewer average calories being consumed.

Natasha Longo has a master's degree in nutrition and is a certified fitness and nutritional counselor. She has consulted on public health policy and procurement in Canada, Australia, Spain, Ireland, England and Germany.


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