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Sept 13, 2012 by NATASHA LONGO
Contrary to Conventional Medicine, High-Fat Diets Lower Blood Sugar, Cholesterol, Reset Metabolism and Prevent Obesity


Most physicians seem to parrot the same old advice day in and day out--exercise, don't smoke and maintain a low fat diet. Turns out that if you're interested in lowering blood sugar, resetting your metabolism and preventing weight gain, a low-fat diet is not in your best interest.


By high-fat we don't mean processed or fried fatty foods with little nutrition. We mean high nutrient, energy efficient foods such as nuts, avocados, organic eggs, olive oil, non-pasteurized hard cheese and organic fatty fish.

A recent two-year dietary study published in the journal Diabetologiashowed that food with a lot of fat and few carbohydrates has a better effect on blood sugar levels and blood lipids. Despite the increased fat intake with a larger portion of saturated fatty acids, their lipoproteins did not get worse. Quite the contrary -- the HDL, or ‘good’ cholesterol, content increased on the high fat diet.

Other patients with atherosclerosis have been found to lose weight on a high fat, no-starch Atkins-style followed for 6 weeks, without increasing their blood fat (lipid) levels.

A study, led in Australia by the Monash Obesity and Diabetes Institute (MODI) at Monash University, found a high-fat diet causes brain cells to become insulated from the body preventing vital signals, which tell the body to stop eating and to burn energy, from reaching the brain efficiently.

New research from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem shows that a carefully scheduled high-fat diet can lead to a reduction in body weight and a unique metabolism in which ingested fats are not stored, but rather used for energy at times when no food is available. The results were published in The FASEB Journal under the title "Timed high-fat diet resets circadian metabolism and prevents obesity".

The researchers wanted to determine the effect of combining a high-fat diet with long-term feeding on a fixed schedule. They hypothesized that careful scheduling of meals would regulate the biological clock and reduce the effects of a high-fat diet that, under normal circumstances, would lead to obesity.

For 18 weeks they fed a group of mice a high-fat diet on a fixed schedule (eating at the same time and for the same length of time every day). They compared these mice to three control groups: one that ate a low-fat diet on a fixed schedule, one that ate an unscheduled low-fat diet (in the quantity and frequency of its choosing), and one that ate an unscheduled high-fat diet.

All four groups of mice gained weight throughout the experiment, with a final body weight greater in the group that ate an unscheduled high-fat diet. But surprisingly, the mice on the scheduled high-fat diet also had a lower final body weight than the mice that ate an unscheduled low-fat diet, even though both groups consumed the same amount of calories.

In addition, the mice on the scheduled high-fat diet exhibited a unique metabolic state in which the fats they ingested were not stored, but rather utilized for energy at times when no food was available, such as between meals.

According to Prof. Froy, "Our research shows that the timing of food consumption takes precedence over the amount of fat in the diet, leading to improved metabolism and helping to prevent obesity. Improving metabolism through the careful scheduling of meals, without limiting the content of the daily menu, could be used as a therapeutic tool to prevent obesity in humans."

Natasha Longo has a master's degree in nutrition and is a certified fitness and nutritional counselor. She has consulted on public health policy and procurement in Canada, Australia, Spain, Ireland, England and Germany.

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