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Nov 11, 2012 by MAE CHAN
55 Percent of Children Outgrow Egg Allergies and Almost 70 Percent Can Eliminate Them Through Incremental Exposure


We have a phobia in our society when it comes to children and allergies. Our first instinct is to keep them away from the food-culprits indefinitely. However, a novel approach to treating childhood allergies is showing that constant exposure in small doses may be the key to eliminating a large percentage of symptoms as they age.The Vaccination Link To Egg Allergies

A growing number of scientists and physicians maintain that most standard vaccinations permanently disturb the developing immune system, setting the stage for hypersensitive reactions to foods and other common substances. In fact, childhood illnesses such as measles, mumps, and whooping cough may actually reduce the risk of allergy, says Konrad Kail, N.D.

Vaccines clog our lymphatic system and lymph nodes with large protein molecules which have not been adequately broken down by our digestive processes, since vaccines by pass digestion with injections. This is why vaccines are linked to allergies, because they contain large proteins which as circulating immune complexes (CICs) or "klinkers" which cause our body to become allergic.

Approximately 55 percent of children may outgrow their allergies, but with the increased frequency of recommended vaccines before the age of 3, severe allergic reactions will likely increase.

Egg is the second most common food allergy in early childhood. Approx 1.5 to 3.2 percent of all children under 3 have an egg allergy. It is fast becoming a recognized fact that those with an egg allergy should consult their doctor before receiving a vaccination. This is because occasionally vaccines are grown in cell cultures of chick embryo’s and may cause a reaction.

"We find that unvaccinated children have the least incidence of life-threatening allergic responses to egg, soy, and nuts," said biomedical and immunology specialist Oslana Ammal from the Union Territory of Pondicherry, India.

Keeping Egg Allergies At Bay

"More than half of egg allergic children can tolerate hen’s eggs when they are baked at 350 degrees in products such as cakes and breads," said allergist Rushani Saltzman, M.D., lead study author and ACAAI member. "Dietary introduction of baked egg by an allergist can broaden a child’s diet, improve quality of life and likely accelerate the development of an egg tolerance."

Ruchi Gupta, M.D., found that out of the eight common food allergens, children most commonly outgrew egg allergy. "Food tolerance was observed in one in four children, with 55 percent outgrowing their egg allergy by age seven," said Dr. Gupta. "Developing an egg tolerance is the most common for children, followed by milk. A small proportion outgrew shellfish and tree nut allergies."

Pediatrician Fatima Arash, M.D., says that a high percentage of children can eliminate allergy sensitivities by incremental exposures to the allergen, especially eggs. "Under proper supervision, almost 70 percent of egg allergies can be reversed in children before the age of eight by incrementally exposing the immune system so that it gradually tames the defense mechanism and no longer reacts to antigens violently," she stated.

If children have shown a severe reaction to eggs in the past they are less likely to outgrow the allergy but it's not impossible, according to researchers. Severe symptoms include rapid swelling of the skin and tissue, difficulty breathing and life-threatening anaphylaxis.

"While these studies show many positive findings for children with egg allergy, parents must practice caution," said allergist Richard Weber, M.D., ACAAI president-elect. "Introducing an allergen back into a child’s diet can have severe consequences, and only should be done under the care of a board-certified allergist."

Mae Chan holds degrees in both physiology and nutritional sciences. She is also blogger and and technology enthusiast with a passion for disseminating information about health.

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