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FEBRUARY 2, 2015 by MAE CHAN
L-Glutamine Changes Gut Bacteria Leading To Weight Loss


L-Glutamine is the most common amino acid found in your muscles and it plays a key role in protein metabolism, and the ability to secrete human growth hormone, which helps metabolize body fat and support new muscle growth. Researchers have now found that a daily L-glutamine dose of 30 grams per day was associated with a significant reduction in the ratio of specific biomarkers for obesity.

L-Glutamine supplementation promotes a positive nitrogen balance and prevents the loss of muscle. Recent studies have shown that taking just 2 grams of L-Glutamine can increase growth hormone levels by 400%.

The 30g dose studied was associated with a significant reduction in the ratio of Firmicutes to Bacteroidetes in obese and overweight people.

"The finding that L-glutamine promotes changes in the gut microbiota composition provides support for the importance of some nutrients in modulating the intestinal bacterial profile," wrote the researchers in Nutrition . "These changes resembled the weight loss programs established in the literature."

Gut health and obesity

The study adds to emerging body of science supporting the effects of gut microflora on metabolic factors and obesity. The connection between gut microbiota and energy homeostasis and inflammation and its role in the pathogenesis of obesity-related disorders are increasingly recognized.

Animals models of obesity connect an altered microbiota composition to the development of obesity, insulin resistance, and diabetes in the host through several mechanisms: increased energy harvest from the diet, altered fatty acid metabolism and composition in adipose tissue and liver.

Along with the increasing worldwide incidence of obesity-associated disorders, research has recently unraveled important pathways reciprocally connecting metabolism with the immune system of which L-glutamine plays a role. Although not a substitute for diet and exercise, manipulation of the gut microbiome through supplementation represents a novel approach to treating obesity.

A 2005 study by Jeffrey Gordon and his group at Washington University in St. Louis indicated that obese mice had lower levels of Bacteroidetes and higher levels of Firmicutes, compared with lean mice.

One year later and Dr Gordon's reported similar findings in humans: The microbial populations in the gut are different between obese and lean people, and that when the obese people lost weight their microflora reverted back to that observed in a lean person, suggesting that obesity may have a microbial component (Nature, Vol. 444, pp. 1022-1023, 1027-1031).

Diet has recently been shown to strongly and rapidly influence the composition of the gut microbiota, raising the question of whether the diet independent of the obese phenotype is responsible for the changes in gut microbe composition.

A more recent paper from the same group in Science Translational Medicine (Vol. 3, 106ra106) reported that ingestion of probiotic bacteria produced a change in many metabolic pathways, particularly those related to carbohydrate metabolism.

The new study, albeit small scale and of limited duration, suggested that the amino acid L-glutamine may also have weight management potential by changing the bacterial composition in the gut.

The Brazilian researchers did not observe any changes in body weight during their 14 day study, but noted that a longer intervention period "may result in metabolic changes".

Study details

The researchers recruited 33 overweight and obese adults, aged between 23 and 59 and randomly assigned them receive supplements of L-glutamine or L-alanine for two weeks.

Results showed that the L-glutamine group exhibited statistically significant differences in the Firmicutes and Actinobacteria phyla compared with the ALA group.

A reduction of 0.3 was observed in the ratio of Firmicutes to Bacteroidetes ratio in the L-glutamine group, they added (from 0.85 to 0.57), while L-alanince was associated with an increased from 0.91 to 1.12.

"Thus, these findings suggest that oral supplementation of L-glutamine have similar effects on gut microbiota as weight loss," said the researchers. "We would like to highlight that although the age range of the volunteers was large (23-59 y) and aging may have an effect on intestinal microbiota, the results obtained in this study were statistically significant."

Commenting on a potential mechanism, they noted that L-Glutamine supplementation may reduce pro-inflammatory cytokines. "Some bacteria genera are associated with gut inflammation," they wrote. "For example, increased levels of Veillonella are associated with higher levels of gut inflammation and the development of colitis and Crohn's disease. In our study, the number of bacteria from the Veillonella genus reduced after L-glutamine supplementation, suggesting that L-glutamine may have an anti-inflammatory effect, at least in part, due to the decrease of this genus.

"In addition, increased abundance of the Prevotella genus has been described as a shield against inflammation and non-infectious diseases of the colon. After L-glutamine supplementation, but not after alanine, we observed an increase in Prevotella, suggesting that L-glutamine may have a protective effect on the gut via modulation of bacteria."

Source:
nutritionjrnl.com
diabetesjournals.org
nature.com

Mae Chan holds degrees in both physiology and nutritional sciences. She is also blogger and and technology enthusiast with a passion for disseminating information about health.

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