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JANUARY 29, 2016 by DR. ELDON DAHL
The Thymus Gland Provides Crucial Immunity
  

The body's immune system is always working at some level, and as time goes on, scientists continue to discover just how crucial its role can be.


Just last month, the Perelman School of Medicine in Pennsylvania released a study noting that recurrence of HER2-positive breast cancer may be due to an immune system weakness brought about by the cancer. While the researchers suggest a vaccine targeting HER2, we believe the body is fully equipped to not just meet, but exceed this challenge via the thymus gland. 

The thymus gland is one of the principle glands for the auto immune system. It is composed of two soft pinkish-grey lobes lying in a bib-like fashion just below the thyroid gland and above the heart.  It is also known as the longevity gland.

The thymus produces T-lymphocytes, a type of white blood cell responsible for ”cell-mediated immunity.” This term refers to immune mechanisms not controlled or mediated by antibodies.  Cell-mediated immunity is extremely important in resisting infection by mold-like bacteria: yeast, fungi, parasites, viruses, toxins and allergens. The function of the thymus gland is to program white blood cells, the body’s immune army, in their various tasks and then send them into the blood to recognize and destroy pathogens. It ”instructs” certain T-cells what to attack and when.

Some of the T-cells, in turn, control other white cells, which are responsible for maintaining certain antibodies.  Without the thymus’s instructions, the T-cells may fail to attack enemies like bacteria, viruses, and cancer cells, or they may even mistake some of your own cells for an invading enemy and attack you-known as autoimmune disease.  Examples of autoimmune disease are: multiple sclerosis, cancer, atherosclerosis, adult-onset diabetes, and rheumatic diseases such as arthritis.

The thymus gland, weighs less than half of an ounce at birth, but by puberty, the thymus will reach to its maximum size of about 10 ounces. After age 20, the thymus begins to shrink (atrophy) and thymic cells progressively die off to be replaced by fat and connective tissue. At the critical early twenties stage, the abundance of well-functioning T-cells regulate the immune system and help the body fight off pathogens and disease. But with the inexorable shrinking of the thymus gland over time, by about age forty, the output of thymic hormones has decreased significantly, and the T-cells have begun to lose their effectiveness. It is this gradual loss of functioning T-cells that is thought to be responsible for many of the age-related changes in the immune system.

This is where our Thymus Gland comes in. Glandular therapy is useful if a patient’s endocrine system is under-producing or under-secreting a specific hormone. It can also be used when an organ is weak or diseased-for example, such is often the case with cancer patients. Because glandular therapy is generally effective for those diagnosed with a terminal illness, it is also recommended for preventative measures. Another principle behind the benefit of glandular therapy is that glandular tissues are rich in many nutrients, including vitamins, minerals, amino acids, fatty acids, polypeptides, enzymes, and many other substances, and this is another reason why they work. The tissues work with all other products and foods you ingest. In this sense, glandular therapy can supply your missing essential nutritional needs in a highly efficient manner. For a tissue cell to repair or replace itself, it must have the raw materials to do so. Glandular therapy provides these raw materials to your weakened organs, glands, and other tissues so that they can start the process of regeneration.

What better way to boost your T cells than to strengthen the gland that supplies them? Choose a supplement such as Thymus Gland formulated from organic sources. Cellular delivery is as important as the gland itself. Zinc and B-6 must be available within the system for thymic absorption to occur, and because of this, formulation which omit vital transporters should be avoided.

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