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APRIL 28, 2016 by KAREN FOSTER
Those Little Laundry Detergent Packets Cause Serious Medical Outcomes Over Other Types of Detergent


One day we will all wonder why we ever made detergents so toxic--after all they are going on the clothes we put on our backs. A new study conducted by the Center for Injury Research and Policy of the Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital and the Central Ohio Poison Center found that exposure to laundry detergent packets is more dangerous to young children than exposure to other types of laundry and dishwasher detergent.


David Steinman, an environmental health consumer advocate with the Green Patriot Working Group (GPWG) and former representative at the National Academy of Sciences, has been on a mission since 2007 to organize product testing for the petrochemical 1,4-dioxane in your personal care and household cleaning products. They found about two-thirds of the laundry detergents tested contained 1,4-dioxane.

Besides 1,4-dioxane, the average detergent has a long list of chemical ingredients, none of which are good for you or the environment. Anything in such a product can potentially be absorbed through your skin, or evaporate into the air you breathe.

The study published online in Pediatrics, found that from January 2013 through December 2014 Poison Control Centers in the U.S. received 62,254 calls related to laundry and dishwasher detergent exposures among children younger than 6 years old. The study included calls about both traditional detergent and detergent packets and found that detergent packets accounted for 60 percent of all calls. Almost half (45 percent) of the calls for exposure to laundry detergent packets were referred to a health care facility for evaluation and treatment, significantly more than calls related to exposures to traditional laundry detergent (17 percent), traditional dishwasher detergent (four percent), or dishwasher detergent packets (five percent).

Incidents related to laundry detergent packets saw the biggest rise -- increasing 17 percent over the two year study period. Poison control centers received more than 30 calls a day about children who had been exposed to a laundry detergent packet, which is about one call every 45 minutes.

"We can’t watch our children every second of every day, no matter how vigilant we are," she said. "Kids move quickly and can slip out from under our watchful eyes in a matter of seconds, and that’s all it takes for something bad to happen."

In addition, the most serious clinical effects such as coma, trouble breathing, heart problems, and death, were only seen in children exposed to the chemicals in laundry detergent packets. The risks of having a clinical effect, a serious medical outcome, hospitalization, or intubation were significantly higher for children who had been exposed to the chemicals in a laundry detergent packet than for those exposed to any other type of laundry or dishwasher detergent. At least one child a day in the U.S. was admitted to the hospital due to a laundry detergent packet exposure. The two child deaths in this study were both associated with exposure to laundry detergent packets.

In an effort to reduce unintentional exposures to the contents of laundry detergent packets, ASTM published a voluntary Standard Safety Specification for Liquid Laundry Packets in 2015, but some experts feel it did not go far enough.

"This voluntary standard is a good first step, but it needs to be strengthened," said Gary Smith, MD, DrPH, the senior author of the study and director of the Center for Injury Research and Policy at Nationwide Children’s Hospital. "Unless this unacceptably high number of exposures declines dramatically, manufacturers need to continue to find ways to make this product and its packaging safer for children."

Experts recommend that families with children younger than 6 years old use traditional detergent instead of packets. "Many families don’t realize how toxic these highly concentrated laundry detergent packets are," says Marcel J. Casavant, MD a co-author of the study, chief of toxicology at Nationwide Children’s Hospital and medical director of the Central Ohio Poison Center. "Use traditional laundry detergent when you have young kids in your home. It isn’t worth the risk when there is a safer and effective alternative available."

There are many ways to make your own laundry detergent but not all formulas are non-toxic

How To Make Your Own Natural, Non-Toxic Laundry Detergent

Formula:
2 1/4 cups of castile liquid soap (use dr. bronner's)
1/4 cup of distilled white vinegar
3/4 cup water
* Optional 1 tablespoon glycerin (if you require thickening agent)
* Optional - 15 drops essential oil (i.e. lavender or any anti-bacterial/anti-fungal)

Whisk solution and it's ready to go. Use 1/4 cup for a regular load or 1/2 cup for an extra large load.

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