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  OCTOBER 23, 2018 by MARCO TORRES
Does Cannabis Make You More Creative?


Cannabis is one of the most powerful healing plants on the planet. One of the most important roles cannabinoids play is in the suppression of cancer. However, the plant's impact on our psychological health, including artistic creativity and convergent thinking have now been highlighted by a study in Consciousness and Cognition.


A new study on the effects of smoking marijuana and its relation to creativity has some interesting results. As one of nature's most medicinal plants, it turns out how it makes us feel and think goes beyond logical interpretations.

The study consisted of 412 marijuana users and 309 non-users, and they attempted to answer the question: Does smoking marijuana make you more creative?

Previous research suggests cannabis may enhance some aspects of creativity, although the results remain somewhat equivocal. Moreover, it is unclear whether differences in cannabis users' personalities may account for any potentially beneficial effects of cannabis on creativity.

When cannabis is used over a period of time, it allows us to witness our many subtle motives which, under normal consciousness, are usually not noticeable. Duality within human consciousness becomes clear as does the ego and alter ego. With this expansiveness which occurs after ingesting cannabis, users may begin to notice infinite possibilities to raise the quality of his/her life that would otherwise have remained hidden from normal, defensive consciousness. And feelings of health and happiness naturally lead to hope and creativity, which of itself can be curative.

Emily LaFrance, the co-author of the study and graduate student at Washington State University, says she first became interested in the topic when she noticed that a lot of her favorite artists admit they smoke marijuana. "This cannabis use was commonly thought to have been a cause of the creative success of many artists," she explains. "I began to wonder about this commonly held idea -- are cannabis users really more creative than non-users?"

The study is called "Inspired by Mary Jane? Mechanisms underlying enhanced creativity in cannabis users" and was published in Consciousness and Cognition. It examined the participants over a variety of areas including psychological tests, and measuring creative works and achievements.

Some major points from the study include:

  • Cannabis users were more likely to be extroverted and open to new experiences.
  • Cannabis users reported higher levels of artistic creativity, but not a higher amount of creative achievements or completed works.
  • Cannabis users performed better on a convergent thinking test (which tests creative problem solving).


Overall, they did find that those who use marijuana are more creative than their counterparts who do not use it, but when they dug deeper they made a startling discovery.

When the scientists included the personality traits into the data, they realized that these traits on their own could determine whether a person is more open to using marijuana, as well as drive a tendency to be more creative.

"Cannabis users may be more creative than non-users," LaFrance says, "but this is not because using cannabis has increased their creativity." She goes on to explain that it's the fact that marijuana users "are more open to experience than non-users, and this openness to experience is associated with both cannabis use, and heightened creativity."

So there you have it: if you smoke pot you're probably more creative than people who don't...but it's not necessarily the weed that's got your creativity going. It was you all along!

Note: This study was conducted with all subjects being sober, meaning none of them were under the influence of marijuana during the test.

Many researchers continue to be interested in the idea that psychedelics facilitate communication across the brain and, more specifically, how the default-mode network in the brain, arguably science’s best biological correlate of the self, normally works to constrain this.


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